A Hyperbole of Antithesis

People all the time love to quote Malachi 1:2-3 and Romans 9:13 which says, “Jacob I’ve loved, but Esau I’ve hated,” to prove that God literally hated Esau, and that was His sovereign choice.

I remember learning in  college (Moody Bible Institute) that this example is what’s known as a “hyperbole of antithesis.” Here are two of them:

“If anyone comes to Me and does not hate his father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters, yes, and his own life also, he cannot be My disciple. (Luke 14:26)

Let’s break this down:

If anyone comes to me and does not hate

His Father

Mother

Wife

Children

Brothers and Sisters

He cannot be a Christian.

By the way, how are you doing with that?

This brings along with it a hearty laugh, followed by the words, “That’s not what’s intended by that verse!”

“That’s a hyperbole!”

Correct! I agree.

And here’s another example of a hyperbole of antithesis:

As it is written, “Jacob I have loved, but Esau I have hated.” (Romans 9:13)

Notice the comparative structure of both of these.

What the Lord is saying is, your love for Him ought to dwarf your love for everything else, by comparison.

When the smoke clears, at the conclusion of Revelation chapter 19, and the Great White Throne is before one and all, it’s hard to fathom that God hated some 90 % of His creation.

I can still envision this sign hanging over the gates of heaven:

“Whosoever will, let him take the water of life freely.” (Revelation 22:17)

It’s your choice!

This I know, and will boldly declare: GOD LOVES YOU!!

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Keep your city clean!

Keep your city clean! By Paul Esposito, Th.D.

Sorry to admit it, but I just love King David’s methods for keeping his house and his city clean, and pure.

It’s found in Psalm 101.

 4 A perverse heart shall depart from me; I will know no evil.

5 Whoever secretly slanders his neighbor, him I will destroy; No one who has a haughty look and an arrogant heart will I endure.

6 My eyes shall be upon the faithful of the land, that they may dwell with me; He who walks in a blameless way is the one who will minister to me.

7 He who practices deceit shall not dwell within my house; He who speaks falsehood shall not maintain his position before me.

8 Every morning I will destroy all the wicked of the land, So as to cut off from the city of the Lord all those who do iniquity. (Psalm 101:4-8, NASB)

So what’s David’s methods? I’m afraid they wouldn’t go over too well today!

Here’s a short list of 8 things (the list is not exhaustive)

  1. The faithful will dwell with me. (vs 6)

David insisted on living with and being surrounded by faithful people.

  1. The blameless will minister to me (vs 6)

He starts with those who he wants around him, those who bring him joy, and whose company he appreciates. Now, he reveals the types of people he will not endure:

  1. Perverted people shall depart from me. (vs 4)
  2. Those who slander others will be killed. (vs 5)

(Ah, King David, a man after God’s own heart!)

Keep in mind, God’s not too fond of folks like this, either! In Proverbs 6:19, David’s son Solomon, under divine inspiration, says this:

These six things the Lord hates, Yes, seven are an abomination to Him:
A proud look, A lying tongue, Hands that shed innocent blood,
A heart that devises wicked plans, Feet that are swift in running to evil,
A false witness who speaks lies, And one who sows discord among brethren. (Prov 6:16-19)

  1. Deceitful people are banned from my house (vs 7)
  2. All liars will be fired. (vs 7)
  3. The proud and the arrogant I will not endure (vs 5)

And lastly, number 8, and the corresponding reason why:

  1. Every morning I will destroy all the wicked people!

8A—The reason why: To keep the city of the Lord free from iniquity. (vs 8)

So I encourage you all, “Help keep your city clean!”

I wish David would run for office around here!